Friday, July 01, 2005

Pre-4th Roundup

We'll start with Melanie Phillips', who offers a tight little package of prose and pull-quotes that undercuts those in the media who think President Bush should never mention "Iraq" and "9/11" together. Meanwhile, the Power Line guys revisit the joint congressional resolution that approved of the war and KO the talking points of John Kerry et al. This is important enough to blurb
Whereas members of al Qaida, an organization bearing responsibility for attacks on the United States, its citizens, and interests, including the attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, are known to be in Iraq;

Whereas Iraq continues to aid and harbor other international terrorist organizations, including organizations that threaten the lives and safety of United States citizens;

Whereas the attacks on the United States of September 11, 2001, underscored the gravity of the threat posed by the acquisition of weapons of mass destruction by international terrorist organizations;

Whereas Congress has taken steps to pursue vigorously the war on terrorism through the provision of authorities and funding requested by the President to take the necessary actions against international terrorists and terrorist organizations, including those nations, organizations, or persons who planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored such persons or organizations;

Whereas the President and Congress are determined to continue to take all appropriate actions against international terrorists and terrorist organizations, including those nations, organizations, or persons who planned, authorized, committed, or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September 11, 2001, or harbored such persons or organizations
Power Line also explains "that the resolution puts the Iraq war in the context of September 11 without saying that Iraq was involved in those attacks; it recites what was indisputably true--that Iraq harbored members of al Qaeda. One would think that administration critics like Joe Biden, John Kerry, Harry Reid and Chuck Schumer would remember what was in the resolution, since they voted for it." Sure.

In a tangentially related piece, Roger Simon remarks on the Democrat's popularity and why "false consiousness" prevents them from moving on past moveon.org.

Carroll Andrew Morse proposes that the Dems should look to my alma mater's motto, Acta non Verba, for some direction.

Noting that "the Supreme Court has finally settled the protracted dispute over the constitutionality of posting the Ten Commandments in and around public buildings. It has said, unequivocally, that sometimes you can do it and sometimes you can't," Lee Harris asks, "Who separated Church and State?"

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